Inception Ending Explained

Inception Ending Explained

May 4, 2020 0 By Siraphop Wachirabunjong

Inception released in 2010 in an American science fiction movie. Written, directed and produced by Christopher Nolan who is a most popular movie director in the world. His feature directorial debut was the neo-noir crime thriller Following (1998) which was made on a shoestring budget of $6,000. He starts being well know with Warners Bros’ superhero film Batman Begin. In Inception is full with star cast such as Leonardo Di Caprio, Joseph Gordon-Levitt, Marion Cotillard, Cillian Murphy, Michael Caine, Tom Hardy, Tom Berenger, Ken Watanabe and Ellen Page. The story about Dom Cobb is a skilled thief, the absolute best in the dangerous art of extraction, stealing valuable secrets from deep within the subconscious during the dream state, when the mind is at its most vulnerable. Cobb’s rare ability has made him a coveted player in this treacherous new world of corporate espionage, but it has also made him an international fugitive and cost him everything he has ever loved. Now Cobb is being offered a chance at redemption. One last job could give him his life back but only if he can accomplish the impossible, inception. Instead of the perfect heist, Cobb and his team of specialists have to pull off the reverse: their task is not to steal an idea, but to plant one. If they succeed, it could be the perfect crime. But no amount of careful planning or expertise can prepare the team for the dangerous enemy that seems to predict their every move. An enemy that only Cobb could have seen coming. This movie gets 8.8 in IMBD which is it in thirteen place top rate movie all time, gets fresh tomato eighty seven percent from Rotten Tomatoes. After finish watching movie, I believe every people need an enplane in the end of movie. 

Warning: Spoiler

First, I will explain the rules of dream in inception that Nolan created for the film. When you dream you will never know this is a dream or a reality. Moreover, it has dream level the deeper you go, the further removed your mind is from reality. We all know what that’s like: the deeper you sleep, the harder it is to be woken up and the more real-feeling a dream becomes. If you’re in a deep enough sleep, not even the usual physical ques to wake up effect you, such as the sensation of falling “the kick” or even, say, having to go to the bathroom. If reach the Limbo state it can be so difficult to wake, and the dream can feel so real, the mind will stops trying to wake at all, the mind accepts the dream as its reality, like slipping into a coma. When you wake up in Limbo you will doesn’t realize that is have a real world, which is why Cobb and his wife Mal were trapped in Limbo for what seemed like decades. In Limbo, the mind will work so fast that real world, so it can be interpreted as years gone by. When Saito was killed from the gunshot wound he received on level 1 of the dream, his mind falls into Limbo, and Saito remains there for the minutes it takes Cobb and Ariadne to follow him into Limbo in those minutes one dream state feel like decades to Saito in his Limbo state.  By the time Cobb deals with expelling Mal’s shadow from his subconscious, Saito has begun to perceive himself as an old man. While movie climax Mal’s shadow stabs Cobb and throws Cobb back out into Limbo. When Cobb wake again in Limbo, his mind is muddled Cobb and Saito are able to remember the important conversations they had and that there is a reality they existed in before Limbo, where both of them had deep desires still waiting to be fulfilled. However, there is a miracle that they remember that limbo is limbo, they are able to wake themselves up 

There are a ton of theories in the end of movie, the two biggest debates being whether Cobb was still in a dream or did he in fact return to his children in the real world. I think from the moment that Cobb and Saito wake up from limbo, Nolan very purposefully shifts the film into an ambiguous state that leaves it somewhat open to the viewer’s perception and interpretation of that perception – two big themes of the movie, coincidentally enough. However, I surely in the end is a reality wrold because if you listen carefully before end credit you will listen a top stop spin, so that can confirm there is a reality. Moreover, the actor who is acting in an old cobb has maintained the end sequence is meant to be in reality, saying, If I’m there, it’s real because I’m never in the dream. I’m the guy who invented the dream. For those who don’t remember, it was Miles who taught son-in-law Cobb how to traverse the dream world. As the writer and director of Inception, Nolan is the definitive authority on the movie, so there’s obviously a lot of weight to his thoughts on the ending. Unsurprisingly, he’s fielded the question very frequently, but he designed it in a way to be purposely unanswerable.

To Nolan, it doesn’t matter if Cobb’s dreaming or not, and people obsessing over that exact detail are missing the point of the scene entirely. Cobb, who spent the entire life trying to determine if he’s in a dream or reality, but he walked away from the top so he could be happy with his children. That’s his character arc. In many respects, this movie debate is this generation’s version debate it like a Blade runner debate in the last generation. A clear answer isn’t going to make much difference and essentially defeat the whole point of the movie. Nolan will probably be asked about this for the rest of his career, but sooner or later, it’ll be time for viewers to believe and respect the director purpose. We’ll add to this post if other Inception cast members give their theory.